Tuesday, June 27, 2006

The Boy Who Peed On Aunt Susan’s Clean Kitchen Floor Feels Old

Once upon a time...I hated to wear clothes.

I loved to feel the cool ocean breeze against my naked body.

I was about eighteen months old.

And we were spending a few weeks in Nantucket.

My family was living in one little beach cottage. And my uncle (Larry) and my future-aunt-to-be (Susan) were staying in a place right next to ours.

Susan was disgusted by the state of the kitchen floor as soon as she arrived…so she got out a mop and bucket…and scrubbed the floor until it was sparkling clean.

Just as the floor finished drying, I wandered in.

Naked.

And peed all over Susan's clean kitchen floor.

Needless to say, my future-aunt-to-be didn't think this was cute.

And so, I became that boy that peed on Aunt Susan’s clean kitchen floor.


My Aunt and Uncle have lived in Denver pretty much my entire life...so I didn't get to see them that much growing up. Only once...maybe twice a year.

But when I did, my Aunt would always remark on how much I'd grown and how she couldn't believe that this giant was the boy that peed on her clean kitchen floor.

I didn't truly understand why my Aunt focused on this incident so much…until today...when my cousin Hannah drove us around Denver.

The very idea that Hannie-Bananie drives is too much for my brain to handle.

And even though I spent all day today with the practically-an-adult Hannah...whenever I think of Hannah I will always think of this...



And try not to think about this...



Because if I do...I’ll end up feeling as old as Jessica Tandy at the end of "Driving Miss Daisy."

And I'm just not ready for that.

1 comment:

Daddy Ru said...

Nakedness was a way of life for the red curly haired,little boy with the rosy checks at Cape Cod that summer. He swam naked and ran across the sand naked.And he and Big Sister stood on the beach and waved at Mr. Rodgers as he sped by in his motor boat. Chef Brockett was also there and Big Sister and Jru were trying to figure out how these TV personalities could leave the make-believe Neighborhood of a TV screen and their own imaginations and walk around in the real world of their childhood.

Time was also spent on a porch whenever snacks were being served and trips along the sandy roads led to ice cream on a hot summer night.

The only sadness came when the little boy got too close to a fishing line and a fish hook had to be carefully extracted from his face by his skilled surgeon Grandfather.